CFL Light Bulbs Pros and Cons

CFL Light Bulbs.  The Facts

 

CFL Lights Bulbs curlyWith the new light bulb standards in the USA, many people are aware of CFLs but are unsure if they’re the right choice.  Here’s what you need to know – without the hype.  Just the facts.

What are CFL light bulbs?

CFLs are simply curly versions of the long tube fluorescent lights you may already have in your kitchen or garage.   But they’re a lot more energy efficient, and they save you money too.  (See the light bulbs types review).

“OK Clare.  Your friends call you the Green Goddess.  So tell me, why should I spend more money on CFLs or LEDs?  They’re supposed to be the best light bulbs types and the right thing to do, but times are tough!  And anyway, I know someone who says the colour is horrible and they don’t dim and they don’t last”.

Great question!

Let’s look at the different aspects.

Are CFLs More Expensive?

Overall, no.  In fact, the US Department of Energy showed the savings over the lifetime of a CFL to be $105!

When you’re buying stuff for home, it’s often difficult to consider long-term instead of short-term benefit with your grocery shopping!    The costs benefits only kick in after a few months, when you start to benefit from not having to replace the bulbs as often, as well as the reduction in electricity costs.

It takes an incandescent bulb 60 watts of energy (electricity) to produce the same amount of light that would take a CFL bulb only 15 watts to produce (General Electric).

Plus, because CFL light bulbs generate less heat, you’ll save on air conditioning cooling costs too!

Tip:  I simply bought one new CFL with each big monthly shop, so that I didn’t really feel the impact on my budget, and gradually replaced all the bulbs in my home.  Replacing every lamp at once might be a bit hairy on the pocket!

View it as a money-saving investment rather than a light bulb purchase.

Tip:  to see exactly how much you would save in the USA by switching from incandescents to CFLs or LEDs, use this free online calculator  (just change the figures to suit your own circumstances).  If you run a business, you can use this calculator for it too.  The figures are really interesting!

Fluorescent light is horrible!

The light from traditional fluorescent tubes is very bright and sharp, and they were often used in kitchens, garages and offices for this reason.  But it’s not the best light for a lounge or a bedroom.

The first CFL light bulbs were only available with that same bright light, so people – rightly – didn’t want them.

But now, CFLs are available in a range of light colours from white to yellow tones, “warm white” or “daylight” for example.   (And they also come in bright colours for parties, or orange CFLs for Halloween, for example).

I’ve also got an article (coming soon) on which type of CFL to use in different areas of your home.

Can I dim CFLs?

Yes you can – but only if you buy the right type – check the packaging.  Again, when they first came out, no dimming was available, but this has changed.

Be aware, however, that the lights with dimming feature will not always last as long as those without dim.

How long do CFLs last, really?

The packaging is required to tell you how long your CFL should last.

“A 800,000kW nuclear power plant could be scrapped if 10 million conventional 100W light bulbs were replaced with 21W …  lamps”  (www.megaman.cc).  Editor’s Note: 10 million incandescents sounds like a lot, but there are 4 billion light sockets in the USA alone!

Do they last as long as that?

I don’t know, to be perfectly honest.  Once they’re in, I tend to forget when I installed them.

But I can tell you that two factors affect the lifespan of CFL light bulbs:

  1. The power supply.  Power sags, brown-outs and other non ‘clean’ power conditions can shorten the lifespan.
  2. The manufacturing quality.  If you buy a really cheap t-shirt and the hems unravel or it goes out of shape after 2 washes, you know it’s because it’s not good quality.  The same applies with CFLs, just like most other products.  Choose a reputable manufacturer / brand  – often, you get what you pay for.

They look funny!

CFL Light Bulbs different looksThis used to be a common complaint – although I hear it less these days as people get more used to the look of the curly CFL light bulbs.

Now, some CFLs come encased in a cover so they look more like incandescents.  (The ones I use for my spotlights are like this).

I remember a delightful period drama on TV where a dowager was most upset with her beloved son for bringing ‘this new-fangled electricity thing’ into her home.  The electric lights were ‘far too bright, and ugly too’ without the softness of the flickering gas lamps, she believed.

So I suppose CFLs are like any other change – they take a bit of getting used to.

They don’t switch on instantly

That’s true.  You switch them on, they give off a dim light for about 2 seconds, then they come up to full brightness.  They used to take longer to switch on fully, now it’s about 2 seconds (longer in extreme cold).  I know we live in an age of instant gratification, but I certainly don’t have an issue with 2 seconds!

But some newer models are now “Instant On CFL” if you prefer.

What about the mercury?

CFL light bulbs contain little mercuryCFLs contain a tiny amount of mercury.

How tiny?

Less than 4 milligrams (mg).

That doesn’t mean much to me (it’s small, but how small?), so here’s a comparison.  Thermometers used to have about 500mg.  So it takes over 100 CFLs to equal one old thermometer.

Newer bulbs now have just 1mg of mercury!

CFLs are safe as long as they are unbroken.

Should I recycle CFLs?

You do need to recycle them once they die, because it’s not good to have mercury in landfills.  Plus, almost all parts of CFLs can be recycled, so it makes sense.

Also some countries, and some US states, require you to recycle them i.e. you are not allowed to put them in the normal trash.  (In the US, visit Earth911 to find out).

Luckily, recycling is easy!

  • Local retailers, your local kerbside pickup and mail-back services are all options.
  • In the USA, Lowes, Home Depot, and IKEA stores offer free collection points for CFLs.
  • In Europe, southern Africa and Australia, most big supermarkets as well as hardware stores have collection boxes for used CFLs.

What if I break a CFL?

Don’t panic!

  1. If you have central heating or air conditioning, switch it off.
  2. Get children and pets out of the room (so they don’t spread the mess or tread on broken glass).
  3. Do NOT vacuum.
  4. Collect broken glass and visible powder with stiff paper and sticky tape, or damp paper towels and wet wipes for hard surfaces.
  5. Place them in a sealable plastic bag and dispose of properly.
  6. Switch the heating / cooling back on.
CFL light bulbs save money and the planet!

CFLs get my Thumbs Up!

So, are CFLs worth it?

To me, CFL lights bulbs are a no-brainer.  Yes, they cost more up front, but swapping over gradually made it easier on the pocket, and now I no longer have to replace bulbs as often, plus I’m saving money – and the planet.

That’s a win-win!

Next:  What about LEDs – they’re seriously expensive!

 

Interesting Articles – Related

New Light Bulb Standards in the US

Light Bulbs Types

LED lights at home and how best to use them

Bedroom Lighting Ideas

Bedroom Reading Lights

Harley LED Lights – Harley Davidson go Green (Video)

LED Kitchen Lights – Ideas

LED Home Lighting – 4 things you need to know when buying LEDs

Example of LEDs (Video)

 

Ekobrew Leak Video Solution

 

42 comments… add one

Your thoughts and opinions are important to me! Do tell me in the comments below!

  • Dan S. 7th March 2013, 8:29 PM

    I have 2 problems with CFL bulbs:

    1. They start out dim & take 30 seconds to 1 minute to get fully bright. Yes, even the more expensive ones that claim to turn on instantly have this problem.

    2. They conduct & radiate high level RF noise, which causes interference with wireless receivers, audio equipment, television, radio, electric guitar, and many other types of electronic equipment. So you can’t use them anywhere near, or even on the same circuit as many of your electronic gadgets or appliances. In some cases the CFL bulbs can actually damage said equipment with the high amounts of radiation they emit. I wonder how the interference affects the human body?

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 19th March 2013, 9:07 AM

      Hi Dan, thanks for your comment!
      For sure, nothing is perfect.
      The slow start to CFLs seems to be worse in colder climates and can be frustrating. (I’m lucky, I live in a warm climate and don’t have the same issues). LEDs would be a good alternative, they are bright as soon as you switch them on. Of course they are more expensive up front, but are greener and save money long-term.
      Although I personally haven’t had any interference with my various electronic equipment – I have lots of bits and pieces all over the house without a problem for the past 5 years or so – I understand there is some RF noise from CFLs. Although it’s deemed safe (so was asbestos!), if it’s a concern then it’s better to switch to LEDs.
      LEDs take a bit of getting used to, as their light is just so different to traditional incandescent light, but they are very flexible, and a good LED store should be able to offer you advice on how to get the light effects you want. Personally, I enjoyed getting creative with how I set up my LEDs. I just did a few at a time due to the high initial cost, and that way it fitted in well with my budget.
      Thanks again!
      Clare

      Reply
  • Mil 8th May 2012, 7:45 PM

    I heard that the cost of making CFLs are really not factored into the cost we are charged and that it is all subsidized. Have you heard this?

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 8th May 2012, 9:01 PM

      Ah, subsidies – don’t get me started! Petrol / gas is subsidized, factory-farmed meat is subsidized, CFLs and some solar power is subsidized, corn is subsidized…. the list is endless.
      The worrying part about subsidies is that they are so entrenched, that it becomes hugely difficult to stop one subsidy without it having a knock-on effect and (probably unintended) consequences.
      It’s supposed to be a ‘free market’ but in fact, it’s anything but.
      Sigh.
      Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  • Suzanne Laramore 3rd May 2012, 9:08 PM

    Thanks for clearing up the misinformation!

    Reply
  • Christian Dating Expert Single Christians Groups 3rd May 2012, 8:28 PM

    Hi Green Goddess,

    Right after I was recently widowed from my late husband and was going to church in San Francisco, closer to where I lived than before, I started volunteering regularly in a Northern California based Christian Conference Center where there were Men’s Retreats, Women’s Minstry and Ladies Retreats, Singles Conference, and an annual Married Couples Retreat. The Christian Retreat Center was located in a beautiful location much like the Resort areas of Southern California. The place was massive. Well, you can only imagine what it’s electricity bills were like. One of the weeks I drove up there, one of our housekeeping chores was to switch out all of the bulbs for CFL light bulbs. They looked kinda of goofy at first. But then we all get used to them andhow they look. And then the first PG&E electric bill arrives, and all the work to do that proves worthwhile with the really wonderful additional money savings. When you are a charity Christian Ministry, how you steward all the monetary budget items really does add up!

    Happy Dating and Relationships,

    April Braswell

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 4th May 2012, 7:03 AM

      April, that is such a wonderful story! I love how you described CFLs as looking ‘goofy’ at first but you then got used to them – I think we all went through that! Absolutely, the electricity bills must have reflected a massive saving, and will continue to do each month – a perfect solution for charities, homes and businesses alike!

      Reply
  • ShaneAric 3rd May 2012, 12:22 AM

    LOL That is a far cry from the horror stories I have heard… Like you need to call in HazMat if you break one of these bulbs.

    Thanks for clearing that up!

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 3rd May 2012, 7:19 AM

      Glad to be of service! (even tho’ I may put HazMat out of a job) 🙂

      Reply
  • Michael D Walker 2nd May 2012, 9:48 PM

    Thanks for such an informative rundown on the pros and cons of CFL light bulbs.

    Michael

    Reply
  • Dan 2nd May 2012, 9:05 PM

    once i got over my ‘they are different so i don’t like them’ stage – i greatly prefer CFL’s

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 11:10 PM

      LOL Dan, I like how you phrase that!

      Reply
  • Margarita @ Body Language Decoding 2nd May 2012, 6:40 PM

    Clare, I use CFLs at home. I always think that saving on the long run is more efficient than saving now. Usually the second option is more expensive. Thanks

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 7:17 PM

      You’re right, short term savings often turn out to be more expensive in the long run, thanks Margarita!

      Reply
  • Cherie Miranda 2nd May 2012, 10:24 AM

    I thought CFLs WERE fluorescent light. I am incorrect in this assumption? Fluorescent light damages your eyes (I think it’s one of the main reasons I have such vision problems), and that’s my primary problem with it. It’s also ugly and completely unnatural. If CFL isn’t all fluorescent, I’m interested…

    Cherie Miranda

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 11:16 AM

      Hi Cherie, yes, CFLs use fluorescent technology. BUT the damage you’re referring to is caused by the blue-whiteness of the light, not by the fluorescent technology itself. The warm white CFLs solve this problem, ditto for LEDs. Also, the flicker rate in CFLs is vastly different, which helps to eliminate associated problems too. I’ll put together a blog post on it, thanks for the suggestion!

      Reply
  • Vitamins Minerals Supplements Enzymes 2nd May 2012, 8:12 AM

    You’re right…when it comes to the environment it is about “long term thinking” – not short term.

    Yours In Health!

    G.E. Moon II

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 9:05 AM

      You put it perfectly!
      Thanks Gary!

      Reply
  • Have You Tried The Paleo Diet Yet 2nd May 2012, 7:41 AM

    Are they going to make them without mercury? I am glad they have improved them over the years. My parents have one in their bathroom and it seems to take 15 seconds to come on.

    Yours In Health!

    Dr. Wendy

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 9:04 AM

      To avoid the mercury you’d need to go to LED lights. CFLs need mercury to make them work.
      15 seconds to switch on fully sounds awfully long! They take longer in very cold climates, but that length of time sounds extreme. Perhaps your parents’ bulb is a very, very early one before the technology improved?
      Thanks for your comment Dr. Wendy!

      Reply
  • Will 2nd May 2012, 7:29 AM

    I think the cost versus longer life and lower energy consumption is an argument not even worth considering. I recently bought 10 CFL lamps at $12.00 each. Sounds expensive but they last for 15 000 hours and only use 11w of power.

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 12:16 PM

      Sound like a good investment! Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  • Bryan 2nd May 2012, 5:29 AM

    It almost seems like a win either way if you make a switch.

    Reply
  • Jc MacKenzie 2nd May 2012, 5:14 AM

    Thanks for the information, good to know the right choice to make.
    Be Well.
    Jc

    Reply
  • Lyle R. Johnson: The Sales Wizard & Mentor 2nd May 2012, 3:58 AM

    Thanks, Clare, I do have a couple CFLs and just bought them on impulse … appreciate your info on what I did. Look forward to the LED Post.

    Lyle – The Sales Wizard

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 12:57 PM

      I think you’re the only person I know who has bought CFLs on impulse! 🙂

      Reply
  • Eva Palmer 2nd May 2012, 2:26 AM

    Hi Clare!
    I think you helped me make a choice! Thanks!
    Do you know that ligth bulb that never died that was invented in the begginning of 20th Century, well, someone here in Spain just made a similar one. That would be really eco-friendly, don’t you think??

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 12:56 PM

      Glad to help! The light bulb that never died – the one in the USA that’s been burning for over 100 years? So you have one in Spain? Is it on a website? It would indeed by very eco friendly to last that long! Thanks Eva!

      Reply
  • Peter Tamosaitis 2nd May 2012, 1:04 AM

    Haven’t really experienced CFL,s yet, but anything that cuts the consumption of electricity has to be a step in the right direction.

    Reply
  • Sonya Lenzo 1st May 2012, 11:55 PM

    Switching over to CFLs seems to be the smart, frugal and sensible thing to do. Or you could do as I seem to be doing and gradually start going to bed when it gets dark and getting up when it gets light!My sister told me it was like living on the farm.
    Sonya Lenzo

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 2nd May 2012, 12:46 PM

      There’s a lot of sense in that – and a great luxury to be able to do so in today’s world!
      Thanks Sonya!

      Reply
  • Octavio 1st May 2012, 6:56 PM

    Some people say they are expensive, though, I feel ecobulbs or ecoproducts are a personal choice.
    Octavio

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 1st May 2012, 10:03 PM

      Absolutely Octavio, CFLs are a personal choice. In fact, everything I talk about in this blog is personal choice. We can all choose what we wish – to be fit, healthy, wealthy, green, we can learn new skills, meet people, earn money, save money, find information and millions of other personal choices on the internet. CFLs are simply another choice. I provide information to my readers, it’s up to my readers to make their own personal choice. I agree!

      Reply
  • Covert Hypnosis 1st May 2012, 3:13 PM

    I know a few people who made slow switches to CFL’s, and they don’t have anything bad to say about them!

    Do CFL’s burn out the same as normal incandescents?

    Mark Hogan

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 1st May 2012, 4:51 PM

      “Slow switches to CFLs” – that’s definitely the easiest way to do it, and I’m certainly very happy with my lights. Great question Mark, CFLs don’t pop or flash like an incandescent when they die. Instead, they (normally) just get dimmer and then eventually stop working. However, some of the big brand manufacturers are in fact making them pop or flash, as customers were mis-interpreting the end-of-life signs – interesting, isn’t it?

      Reply
  • […] incandescent light bulbs with CFLs or […]

  • Dan S. says:

    I have 2 problems with CFL bulbs:

    1. They start out dim & take 30 seconds to 1 minute to get fully bright. Yes, even the more expensive ones that claim to turn on instantly have this problem.

    2. They conduct & radiate high level RF noise, which causes interference with wireless receivers, audio equipment, television, radio, electric guitar, and many other types of electronic equipment. So you can’t use them anywhere near, or even on the same circuit as many of your electronic gadgets or appliances. In some cases the CFL bulbs can actually damage said equipment with the high amounts of radiation they emit. I wonder how the interference affects the human body?

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Hi Dan, thanks for your comment!
      For sure, nothing is perfect.
      The slow start to CFLs seems to be worse in colder climates and can be frustrating. (I’m lucky, I live in a warm climate and don’t have the same issues). LEDs would be a good alternative, they are bright as soon as you switch them on. Of course they are more expensive up front, but are greener and save money long-term.
      Although I personally haven’t had any interference with my various electronic equipment – I have lots of bits and pieces all over the house without a problem for the past 5 years or so – I understand there is some RF noise from CFLs. Although it’s deemed safe (so was asbestos!), if it’s a concern then it’s better to switch to LEDs.
      LEDs take a bit of getting used to, as their light is just so different to traditional incandescent light, but they are very flexible, and a good LED store should be able to offer you advice on how to get the light effects you want. Personally, I enjoyed getting creative with how I set up my LEDs. I just did a few at a time due to the high initial cost, and that way it fitted in well with my budget.
      Thanks again!
      Clare

  • […] CFL Pros and Cons […]

  • Mil says:

    I heard that the cost of making CFLs are really not factored into the cost we are charged and that it is all subsidized. Have you heard this?

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Ah, subsidies – don’t get me started! Petrol / gas is subsidized, factory-farmed meat is subsidized, CFLs and some solar power is subsidized, corn is subsidized…. the list is endless.
      The worrying part about subsidies is that they are so entrenched, that it becomes hugely difficult to stop one subsidy without it having a knock-on effect and (probably unintended) consequences.
      It’s supposed to be a ‘free market’ but in fact, it’s anything but.
      Sigh.
      Thanks for your comment!

  • […] CFLs – myths revealed […]

  • Suzanne Laramore says:

    Thanks for clearing up the misinformation!

  • Christian Dating Expert Single Christians Groups says:

    Hi Green Goddess,

    Right after I was recently widowed from my late husband and was going to church in San Francisco, closer to where I lived than before, I started volunteering regularly in a Northern California based Christian Conference Center where there were Men’s Retreats, Women’s Minstry and Ladies Retreats, Singles Conference, and an annual Married Couples Retreat. The Christian Retreat Center was located in a beautiful location much like the Resort areas of Southern California. The place was massive. Well, you can only imagine what it’s electricity bills were like. One of the weeks I drove up there, one of our housekeeping chores was to switch out all of the bulbs for CFL light bulbs. They looked kinda of goofy at first. But then we all get used to them andhow they look. And then the first PG&E electric bill arrives, and all the work to do that proves worthwhile with the really wonderful additional money savings. When you are a charity Christian Ministry, how you steward all the monetary budget items really does add up!

    Happy Dating and Relationships,

    April Braswell

    • Clare Delaney says:

      April, that is such a wonderful story! I love how you described CFLs as looking ‘goofy’ at first but you then got used to them – I think we all went through that! Absolutely, the electricity bills must have reflected a massive saving, and will continue to do each month – a perfect solution for charities, homes and businesses alike!

  • […] CFLs – what are the pros and ons? […]

  • ShaneAric says:

    LOL That is a far cry from the horror stories I have heard… Like you need to call in HazMat if you break one of these bulbs.

    Thanks for clearing that up!

  • Michael D Walker says:

    Thanks for such an informative rundown on the pros and cons of CFL light bulbs.

    Michael

  • Dan says:

    once i got over my ‘they are different so i don’t like them’ stage – i greatly prefer CFL’s

  • Margarita @ Body Language Decoding says:

    Clare, I use CFLs at home. I always think that saving on the long run is more efficient than saving now. Usually the second option is more expensive. Thanks

    • Clare Delaney says:

      You’re right, short term savings often turn out to be more expensive in the long run, thanks Margarita!

  • […] CFL light bulbs – is it true that they don’t last and give horrible light? […]

  • […] CFL Light Bulbs […]

  • […] CFL light bulbs – is it true that they don’t last and give horrible light? […]

  • Cherie Miranda says:

    I thought CFLs WERE fluorescent light. I am incorrect in this assumption? Fluorescent light damages your eyes (I think it’s one of the main reasons I have such vision problems), and that’s my primary problem with it. It’s also ugly and completely unnatural. If CFL isn’t all fluorescent, I’m interested…

    Cherie Miranda

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Hi Cherie, yes, CFLs use fluorescent technology. BUT the damage you’re referring to is caused by the blue-whiteness of the light, not by the fluorescent technology itself. The warm white CFLs solve this problem, ditto for LEDs. Also, the flicker rate in CFLs is vastly different, which helps to eliminate associated problems too. I’ll put together a blog post on it, thanks for the suggestion!

  • Vitamins Minerals Supplements Enzymes says:

    You’re right…when it comes to the environment it is about “long term thinking” – not short term.

    Yours In Health!

    G.E. Moon II

  • Have You Tried The Paleo Diet Yet says:

    Are they going to make them without mercury? I am glad they have improved them over the years. My parents have one in their bathroom and it seems to take 15 seconds to come on.

    Yours In Health!

    Dr. Wendy

    • Clare Delaney says:

      To avoid the mercury you’d need to go to LED lights. CFLs need mercury to make them work.
      15 seconds to switch on fully sounds awfully long! They take longer in very cold climates, but that length of time sounds extreme. Perhaps your parents’ bulb is a very, very early one before the technology improved?
      Thanks for your comment Dr. Wendy!

  • Will says:

    I think the cost versus longer life and lower energy consumption is an argument not even worth considering. I recently bought 10 CFL lamps at $12.00 each. Sounds expensive but they last for 15 000 hours and only use 11w of power.

  • Bryan says:

    It almost seems like a win either way if you make a switch.

  • Jc MacKenzie says:

    Thanks for the information, good to know the right choice to make.
    Be Well.
    Jc

  • Lyle R. Johnson: The Sales Wizard & Mentor says:

    Thanks, Clare, I do have a couple CFLs and just bought them on impulse … appreciate your info on what I did. Look forward to the LED Post.

    Lyle – The Sales Wizard

  • Eva Palmer says:

    Hi Clare!
    I think you helped me make a choice! Thanks!
    Do you know that ligth bulb that never died that was invented in the begginning of 20th Century, well, someone here in Spain just made a similar one. That would be really eco-friendly, don’t you think??

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Glad to help! The light bulb that never died – the one in the USA that’s been burning for over 100 years? So you have one in Spain? Is it on a website? It would indeed by very eco friendly to last that long! Thanks Eva!

  • Peter Tamosaitis says:

    Haven’t really experienced CFL,s yet, but anything that cuts the consumption of electricity has to be a step in the right direction.

  • Sonya Lenzo says:

    Switching over to CFLs seems to be the smart, frugal and sensible thing to do. Or you could do as I seem to be doing and gradually start going to bed when it gets dark and getting up when it gets light!My sister told me it was like living on the farm.
    Sonya Lenzo

    • Clare Delaney says:

      There’s a lot of sense in that – and a great luxury to be able to do so in today’s world!
      Thanks Sonya!

  • Octavio says:

    Some people say they are expensive, though, I feel ecobulbs or ecoproducts are a personal choice.
    Octavio

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Absolutely Octavio, CFLs are a personal choice. In fact, everything I talk about in this blog is personal choice. We can all choose what we wish – to be fit, healthy, wealthy, green, we can learn new skills, meet people, earn money, save money, find information and millions of other personal choices on the internet. CFLs are simply another choice. I provide information to my readers, it’s up to my readers to make their own personal choice. I agree!

  • Covert Hypnosis says:

    I know a few people who made slow switches to CFL’s, and they don’t have anything bad to say about them!

    Do CFL’s burn out the same as normal incandescents?

    Mark Hogan

    • Clare Delaney says:

      “Slow switches to CFLs” – that’s definitely the easiest way to do it, and I’m certainly very happy with my lights. Great question Mark, CFLs don’t pop or flash like an incandescent when they die. Instead, they (normally) just get dimmer and then eventually stop working. However, some of the big brand manufacturers are in fact making them pop or flash, as customers were mis-interpreting the end-of-life signs – interesting, isn’t it?