Rainwater Harvesting Tanks – Super Products!

Rainwater Harvesting Tanks – great products to save money!

 

A while ago I published an article on rainwater harvesting which elicited many comments from readers.  Then I came across some great rainwater harvesting tanks and thought I would re-visit the topic.

As you know, rainwater harvesting is simply collecting rainwater as it falls, and then using that water in your garden or to wash a car when it doesn’t rain.  It saves you money, because if you use municipal water to water your garden, you have to pay for it (utility bills).

And – best of all – your plants thrive when they get rainwater! Plants always seem to do better with rainwater rather than tap water.

A rainwater harvesting tank can be as simple as putting a bucket outside – even if you don’t have a garden, you could put a bucket out on your balcony and use it to water your flowers!

Of course a bucket is very practical, but it doesn’t look terribly elegant.  I’ve been hunting for an attractive-looking tank or barrel.  Up till now, I’ve found lots, but they all seem to me to be – well, perhaps best described as “utilitarian” or “practical” rather than attractive.

 

The Algreen 81001 Cascata 65-Gallon Rain Water Collection and Storage System is an exception.  This rainwater harvesting tank is tall and elegant, and you can grow small plants in the top to make it look even better.

 

It’s made of plastic but looks like terracotta.  Now of course plastic isn’t eco-friendly, but in this case it’s recycled plastic, and it’s also very practical because it means it’s really lightweight so you can actually lift the barrel – plus it’s guaranteed not to chip, fade or crack.  It can withstand the rigours of a Canadian winter too!  It really looks like a clay urn.

It takes 65 gallons.  Many other rainwater harvesting barrels come in 50-gallon sizes, and these fill up surprisingly quickly, so it’s nice to find a larger unit.

And it’s easy to install – all you need is a screwdriver, and it’s ready in minutes!

How does it work?

rain barrel cascataWater enters through a downpipe into the top of the unit, and goes through a screen guard to remove debris (and stop mosquitoes).   It is then stored in the urn.

There is a brass spigot at the front, which you can use to fill watering cans, or attach a hose.

Underneath the urn is a connector with a shut-off valve, with a hose attached, that you can use for watering.

At the back of the unit is an overflow valve, to be used in case of heavy rain if the urn fills up.

Other Features

You can plant flowers in the top to further improve the appearance of the barrel (add moss or place soil in netting).

There is a 20-year limited warranty on the barrel.

I think the Algreen 81001 Cascata 65-Gallon Rain Water Collection and Storage System is great – but don’t take only my word for it – a customer gives an honest video review of it below.   And then check below the video for some more great rainwater tanks!

 

 

Other Products

The barrel also comes in a different colour.  If you live in arid or semi-arid regions, a smaller unit might be more appropriate – again, I’ve managed to find an attractive one.

 

rainwater harvesting products
Algreen 81111 65-Gallon Cascata Rain Water Collection and Storage System, Dark Brown

Algreen 81002 Agua 50-Gallon Rain Water Collection and Storage System

There’s also a more traditional portable and collapsible rainwater harvesting tank or barrel if you prefer.

Collapsible 60 Gallon Rain Barrel – Stands 28″ High x 24″ Wide -Flexible laminated polyester offers superior strength, durability, and resistance to weatering. Zippered top with mesh screen to keep leaves and debris from entering rain barrel. On/Off valve on bottom to control flow. Overflow valve included at top.UV Ressistant for years. Capture and store rainwater from your gutter or downspout. Weighs less than 7 lbs when empty.

RTS Home Accents 5512-000100-9100 Decorative Rock Fountain With 34-Gallon Rain Water Collector

And, to save you going to the hardware store for a diverter for your downpipe, you can choose from 2 products here to divert the water from your downpipe safely into your barrel.

Oatey 14209 Mystic Rain Water Downspout Diverter

 

OR

Rainreserve 2012309 Rain Barrel Basic Rain Diverter (Barrel Not Included)

 

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16 comments… add one

Your thoughts and opinions are important to me! Do tell me in the comments below!

  • Sherieka 21st May 2014, 5:57 AM

    Clare, Thanks for the wonderful article which gives an insight to a real eco friendly solution. I am from Sri Lanka where we get frequent rains, and I have experienced many a times how rapidly my lawn starts to grow following rains with the nourishments that rain water brings. However so far I too was using mains water to water the plants, despite feeling guilty for it, but after reading your article gave me impetus to install a harvesting tank that I can find in Sri Lanka as soon as possible. Thank you for sharing your ideas.

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 21st May 2014, 9:28 AM

      Hi Sherieka, thanks for your lovely comment, and it’s great to hear from Sri Lanka! I’m delighted you’re going to install a harvesting tank, it will be SO worth it! Your garden will love you for it.

      Reply
  • alberta ross 20th July 2011, 9:52 PM

    when I built this abode a decade ago I had them put in an underground tank as the place was built – it has been invaluble since – I also collected rain butts each year and attached to the drainpipes (down pipes from gutters) I have 2-3 around each drainpipe so if we have no rain to speak of for months as this spring I never have to use mains water for the garden.

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 18th July 2012, 9:08 AM

      That’s wonderful Alberta! I know it’s more expensive to have an underground tank, but it’s really worthwhile as the water says cool and clean. Well done on great planning and foresight!

      Reply
  • Michael D Walker 19th June 2011, 1:26 AM

    Thanks for sharing the info about this great rain harvesting product! Wish more people were utilizing simple things like this to help stop wasting what nature is providing for free.

    Michael

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 19th June 2011, 10:34 PM

      Yes, it’s funny, because most people like to get something for free – yet not rainwater! But hopefully harvesting is coming back into ‘fashion’ again. Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  • sonya lenzo 8th June 2011, 6:43 AM

    clare,great products and greetings from the sleepy little village of Santa Ana, Costa Rica where I was pleased and surprised to see recycle bins on all the main streets!
    Sonya Lenzo

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 9th June 2011, 7:19 AM

      Sonya, great to hear from you! I know Costa Rica is regarded by many as paradise, so I’m delighted to read about the recycle bins! In fact, Costa Rica has quite a good reputation from an eco-friendly point of view, so thank you for the great feedback!

      Reply
  • Bryan 8th June 2011, 5:59 AM

    I think it is a great idea that more people need to take advantage of….

    Sales Expert

    Reply
  • Dewayne Chriswell 7th June 2011, 2:27 PM

    They look like amazing products. We’re on about 60 days straight without significant rainfall. However, we do currently have a lot of smoke from the Arizona fires…

    Reply
  • John Moulder 7th June 2011, 4:43 AM

    Nice looking water containers . In Australia , underwater tanks are pretty common . The tank can be constructed under your verandah / patio . They hold a huge amount of water .

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 7th June 2011, 6:52 AM

      Hi John, yes, the underground tanks are infinitely superior to the above-ground ones. The water stays fresh longer and they hold much more. But of course they’re more expensive, so many people who don’t live in a very arid area won’t want the expense. The underground tanks can be used for grey water throughout the house if plumbed in properly, and even potable water if set up correctly – definitely a superior way to go!

      Reply
  • Kevin Bettencourt 7th June 2011, 3:01 AM

    Does this have a way to prevent evaporation? Collecting rain water in the desert sounds like a great idea but our extreme temperatures may negate our efforts.

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 7th June 2011, 7:00 AM

      The fact that most of these containers have a cover, plus that they’re made of plastic, help to reduce evaporation, nonetheless there will be some evaporation in a hot climate (less if you can store it in the shade). Personally, I still maintain that it’s worth it to collect the rain – even if you do lose some to evaporation, you’re still gaining ‘free’ water (if you’re legally allowed to do so of course – but that’s a whole other story!) And I’d prefer to have the water myself rather than letting it run off into storm drains etc. Around the world desert dwellers collect rainwater irrespective of evaporation – in some cases, it’s their only source of water.

      Reply
  • How to Find Your Life Partner 7th June 2011, 2:04 AM

    Hi Green Goddess,

    Oh what wonderful rain water harvesting super products for people to use to capture the water we are given by God. (It’s actually ours, not the governments, but let us not get into local politics, lol) I particularly like that a number of the rain water reservoirs are so attractive! If they are going to take up a large space in our backyard, having it being eye appealing is a marvelous thing!

    I will definitely discuss this with my boyfriend for when we share a home together and can put something up in the backyard!

    Happy Dating and Relationships,

    April Braswell

    Reply
    • Clare Delaney 7th June 2011, 7:00 AM

      LOL – yes, the politics are a whole different story! Thanks for your comment April!

      Reply
  • Sherieka says:

    Clare, Thanks for the wonderful article which gives an insight to a real eco friendly solution. I am from Sri Lanka where we get frequent rains, and I have experienced many a times how rapidly my lawn starts to grow following rains with the nourishments that rain water brings. However so far I too was using mains water to water the plants, despite feeling guilty for it, but after reading your article gave me impetus to install a harvesting tank that I can find in Sri Lanka as soon as possible. Thank you for sharing your ideas.

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Hi Sherieka, thanks for your lovely comment, and it’s great to hear from Sri Lanka! I’m delighted you’re going to install a harvesting tank, it will be SO worth it! Your garden will love you for it.

  • alberta ross says:

    when I built this abode a decade ago I had them put in an underground tank as the place was built – it has been invaluble since – I also collected rain butts each year and attached to the drainpipes (down pipes from gutters) I have 2-3 around each drainpipe so if we have no rain to speak of for months as this spring I never have to use mains water for the garden.

    • Clare Delaney says:

      That’s wonderful Alberta! I know it’s more expensive to have an underground tank, but it’s really worthwhile as the water says cool and clean. Well done on great planning and foresight!

  • Michael D Walker says:

    Thanks for sharing the info about this great rain harvesting product! Wish more people were utilizing simple things like this to help stop wasting what nature is providing for free.

    Michael

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Yes, it’s funny, because most people like to get something for free – yet not rainwater! But hopefully harvesting is coming back into ‘fashion’ again. Thanks for your comment!

  • sonya lenzo says:

    clare,great products and greetings from the sleepy little village of Santa Ana, Costa Rica where I was pleased and surprised to see recycle bins on all the main streets!
    Sonya Lenzo

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Sonya, great to hear from you! I know Costa Rica is regarded by many as paradise, so I’m delighted to read about the recycle bins! In fact, Costa Rica has quite a good reputation from an eco-friendly point of view, so thank you for the great feedback!

  • Bryan says:

    I think it is a great idea that more people need to take advantage of….

    Sales Expert

  • Dewayne Chriswell says:

    They look like amazing products. We’re on about 60 days straight without significant rainfall. However, we do currently have a lot of smoke from the Arizona fires…

  • John Moulder says:

    Nice looking water containers . In Australia , underwater tanks are pretty common . The tank can be constructed under your verandah / patio . They hold a huge amount of water .

    • Clare Delaney says:

      Hi John, yes, the underground tanks are infinitely superior to the above-ground ones. The water stays fresh longer and they hold much more. But of course they’re more expensive, so many people who don’t live in a very arid area won’t want the expense. The underground tanks can be used for grey water throughout the house if plumbed in properly, and even potable water if set up correctly – definitely a superior way to go!

  • Kevin Bettencourt says:

    Does this have a way to prevent evaporation? Collecting rain water in the desert sounds like a great idea but our extreme temperatures may negate our efforts.

    • Clare Delaney says:

      The fact that most of these containers have a cover, plus that they’re made of plastic, help to reduce evaporation, nonetheless there will be some evaporation in a hot climate (less if you can store it in the shade). Personally, I still maintain that it’s worth it to collect the rain – even if you do lose some to evaporation, you’re still gaining ‘free’ water (if you’re legally allowed to do so of course – but that’s a whole other story!) And I’d prefer to have the water myself rather than letting it run off into storm drains etc. Around the world desert dwellers collect rainwater irrespective of evaporation – in some cases, it’s their only source of water.

  • How to Find Your Life Partner says:

    Hi Green Goddess,

    Oh what wonderful rain water harvesting super products for people to use to capture the water we are given by God. (It’s actually ours, not the governments, but let us not get into local politics, lol) I particularly like that a number of the rain water reservoirs are so attractive! If they are going to take up a large space in our backyard, having it being eye appealing is a marvelous thing!

    I will definitely discuss this with my boyfriend for when we share a home together and can put something up in the backyard!

    Happy Dating and Relationships,

    April Braswell