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Top 10 Best Tree Tunnels

by Clare Delaney

Most Beautiful Tree Tunnels in the World

 

Tree Tunnel Cherry Blossom

Cherry Blossom – Germany

Trees look wonderful!  They also provide a valuable “green” service by acting as a  “carbon sink”, helping to mop up the carbon we emit to support out our lifestyles.  (Although they can’t cope with the huge amounts we’re producing now).

These photos show that they’re not only useful, but also beautiful.  And they provide not only colour but also shelter and shade.

The first photo of magnificent Cherry Blossom trees is from a quiet street in the German city of Bonn.  All the sweeter because of their short life, the blossoms last a mere 7 to 10 days.

Tree Tunnel Rosewood

Rosewood Avenue, Brazil

Over 100 massive Tipuana or Rosewood trees dominate 3 city blocks in Rua Gonzalo de Carvalho in Brazil.  In the first shot, from the air, you can see how they form a green lung in between the concrete buildings.  At street level you can see the strength and height of the trees.

Of course you’ll already know that if trees are planted correctly, they can save up to 30%  of a building’s air conditioning costs!

Tree Tunnel Fall Colors

Fall Colors, USA

Many parts of the USA are renowned for their magnificent Fall or Autumn colours, and Vermont is no exception.  This photo by Kevin McNeal was taken on the way up Smuggler’s Notch (a Vermont State Park).

Tree Tunnel Gingko

Gingko Trees, Japan

The Gingko tree (Gingko biloba) has always been an important part of Japanese culture.   6 Gingko trees survived the bombing of Hiroshima while almost everything else was destroyed – and they are still alive today according to Wikipedia.  The Japanese call the Gingko the “bearer of hope” and they are popular in gardens and parks throughout Tokyo.  The trees in this photo are apparently in the outer garden of the Meiji Shrine in Tokyo.

Tree Tunnel Yews

Yew Trees, Wales, UK

I thought the Yew trees in this photo were a drawing – they reminded me of a scene from The Lord of the Rings.  They are real however, and form part of the gardens of medieval Aberglasney House in Wales.

They have a fascinating history, and quite recently (after years of neglect) took no less than 9 years of pruning (yes, 9 years!).  They used to be clipped very formally.  But after they’d grown higher than the mansion, the huge project was undertaken to ensure their safety and longevity.  They are now invigorated and healthy, but “it did look drastic at the time” according to one of Aberglasney’s directors.

 Tree Tunnel Beech Trees

Beech Trees, Northern Ireland, UK.

The 5th spot also reminded me of a Tolkien scene. These are in Antrim, Co. Down and are about 300 years old. They were planted by the owner of Gracehill Lodge to impress visitors on their approach to his house.

They are said to be haunted – a maid who lived nearby died in mysterious circumstances and “floats silently” along the road.

Tree Tunnel Bamboo

Bamboo Forest, Japan

This 500m long pathway runs through the Sagano Bamboo Forest in Arashiyama, Japan.  Not only do they look wonderful, but the wind blowing through the trees makes a lovely sound.  Japanese authorities have voted it a “must-preserve sound” of Japan.  I think it’s so great that sounds are worthy of being preserved!  Do you?

Tree Tunnel Ukraine

“Tunnel of Love”, Ukraine

The “Tunnel of Love” is actually a section of private railway, which is used by a wood-working plant near Klevan, a small town in western Ukraine.  Trains run 3 times a day, you can see the track clearly.  The legend says that couples can make a wish while walking through the tunnel, and if their love is strong and pure, it will come true.

Tree Tunnel South Africa

Jacarandas, South Africa

Number 2 out of the Top 10 holds a special place for me.  I lived in Johannesburg, South Africa for a few years and this avenue was just behind our home.  My husband and I often walked along this avenue – sometimes slipping if it had rained as the blossoms made the footpath slippy – and loved the atmosphere.  The Jacaranda tree is native to Central and South America but has been introduced to Australia, India and Africa amongst others.

Johannesburg, said to be home to the largest man-made forest in the world, has many Jacarandas, as does the capital city Pretoria, also called the Jacaranda City because there are more than 70,000 Jacarandas there.

Tree Tunnel Wisteria

Wisteria, Japan

Once the Cherry Blossom season ends, so begins the Wisteria season.  The flowers  in grape -like clusters  are celebrated in the Wisteria Festivals each Spring in Japan.  This photo is of the Ashikaga Flower Park.

Plant a tree today!

Your descendants and visitors will thank you!

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